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China’s state-owned tobacco corporation is rapidly expanding its operations globally. It currently supplies 40 percent of the world’s cigarettes – a figure that is set to grow if current trends continue.

Researchers from China, Africa and Latin America presented their findings on the impact of CNTC’s development for tobacco growers, tobacco users, economies and policymakers worldwide, in a symposium at the 47th Union World Conference on Lung Health in Liverpool, UK.

Several factors are behind CNTC’s push toward globalisation: saturation of the Chinese market; the growing impact of the WHO FCTC to reduce tobacco consumption and accession to the World Trade Organization. CNCT now has operations on every continent.

The corporation’s investment in Latin America and Africa has a three-fold motivation: to secure tobacco leaf supply from some of the world’s largest tobacco producers, to penetrate new markets where tobacco control policies are weak and to form new joint ventures with other big tobacco companies.

In Brazil, for example, China now has a monopoly in tobacco agriculture. Brazil is one of the world’s largest tobacco producers and exporters – 700 Brazilian municipalities are dependent on tobacco farming. Although tobacco consumption in Brazil is on the decrease, the serious social and environmental harms caused by tobacco farming continue unabated, namely child labour and deforestation. And although nicotine dependence is decreasing, economic dependence on tobacco growing remains strong.

The session highlighted the need to address CNTC’s expansion in global tobacco control efforts as it has implications for tobacco control policy worldwide.

 

 

China’s state-owned tobacco corporation is rapidly expanding its operations globally. It currently supplies 40 percent of the world’s cigarettes – a figure that is set to grow if current trends continue.

Researchers from China, Africa and Latin America presented their findings on the impact of CNTC’s development for tobacco growers, tobacco users, economies and policymakers worldwide, in a symposium at the 47th Union World Conference on Lung Health in Liverpool, UK.

Several factors are behind CNTC’s push toward globalisation: saturation of the Chinese market; the growing impact of the WHO FCTC to reduce tobacco consumption and accession to the World Trade Organization. CNCT now has operations on every continent.

The corporation’s investment in Latin America and Africa has a three-fold motivation: to secure tobacco leaf supply from some of the world’s largest tobacco producers, to penetrate new markets where tobacco control policies are weak and to form new joint ventures with other big tobacco companies.

In Brazil, for example, China now has a monopoly in tobacco agriculture. Brazil is one of the world’s largest tobacco producers and exporters – 700 Brazilian municipalities are dependent on tobacco farming. Although tobacco consumption in Brazil is on the decrease, the serious social and environmental harms caused by tobacco farming continue unabated, namely child labour and deforestation. And although nicotine dependence is decreasing, economic dependence on tobacco growing remains strong.

The session highlighted the need to address CNTC’s expansion in global tobacco control efforts as it has implications for tobacco control policy worldwide.

 

 

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